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Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge
Aeromedical Factors

Vision in Flight

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Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

Preface

Acknowledgements

Table of Contents

Chapter 1, Introduction To Flying
Chapter 2, Aircraft Structure
Chapter 3, Principles of Flight
Chapter 4, Aerodynamics of Flight
Chapter 5, Flight Controls
Chapter 6, Aircraft Systems
Chapter 7, Flight Instruments
Chapter 8, Flight Manuals and Other Documents
Chapter 9, Weight and Balance
Chapter 10, Aircraft Performance
Chapter 11, Weather Theory
Chapter 12, Aviation Weather Services
Chapter 13, Airport Operation
Chapter 14, Airspace
Chapter 15, Navigation
Chapter 16, Aeromedical Factors
Chapter 17, Aeronautical Decision Making

Appendix

Glossary

Index

At night, the horizon may be hard to discern due to dark terrain and misleading light patterns on the ground.
Figure 16-15. At night, the horizon may be hard to discern due to dark terrain and misleading light patterns on the ground.

Pilots who are flying at night should strongly consider oxygen
supplementation at altitudes and times not required by the
FAA, especially at night, when critical judgement and hand eye
coordination is necessary (e.g., IFR), or if a smoker or
not perfectly healthy.

Chapter Summary

This chapter provides an introduction to aeromedical factors
relating to flight activities. More detailed information on
the subjects discussed in this chapter is available in the
Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM) and online at www.
faa.gov/pilots/safety/pilot safety brochures.

 

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