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Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge
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Charting the Course

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Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

Preface

Acknowledgements

Table of Contents

Chapter 1, Introduction To Flying
Chapter 2, Aircraft Structure
Chapter 3, Principles of Flight
Chapter 4, Aerodynamics of Flight
Chapter 5, Flight Controls
Chapter 6, Aircraft Systems
Chapter 7, Flight Instruments
Chapter 8, Flight Manuals and Other Documents
Chapter 9, Weight and Balance
Chapter 10, Aircraft Performance
Chapter 11, Weather Theory
Chapter 12, Aviation Weather Services
Chapter 13, Airport Operation
Chapter 14, Airspace
Chapter 15, Navigation
Chapter 16, Aeromedical Factors
Chapter 17, Aeronautical Decision Making

Appendix

Glossary

Index

Pilot’s planning sheet and visual flight log.
Figure 15-26. Pilot's planning sheet and visual flight log.

Charting the Course

Once the weather has been checked and some preliminary
planning done, it is time to chart the course and determine the
data needed to accomplish the flight The following sections
provide a logical sequence to follow in charting the course,
filling out a flight log, and filing a flight plan. In the following
example, a trip is planned based on the following data and
the sectional chart excerpt in Figure 15-25.

Route of flight: Chickasha Airport direct to Guthrie
Airport
True airspeed (TAS)........................................115 knots
Winds aloft...........................................360° at 10 knots
Usable fuel.....................................................38 gallons
Fuel rate............................................................... 8 GPH
Deviation.................................................................. +2°

Steps in Charting the Course
The following is a suggested sequence for arriving at
the pertinent information for the trip. As information is
determined, it may be noted as illustrated in the example of
a flight log in Figure 15-26. Where calculations are required,
the pilot may use a mathematical formula or a manual or
electronic flight computer. If unfamiliar with the use of a
manual or electronic computer, it would be advantageous to
read the operation manual and work several practice problems
at this point.

First draw a line from Chickasha Airport (point A) directly
to Guthrie Airport (point F). The course line should begin at
the center of the airport of departure and end at the center of
the destination airport. If the route is direct, the course line
consists of a single straight line. If the route is not direct, it
consists of two or more straight line segments. For example,
a VOR station which is off the direct route, but which
makes navigating easier, may be chosen.

Appropriate checkpoints should be selected along the route
and noted in some way. These should be easy-to-locate points
such as large towns, large lakes and rivers, or combinations of
recognizable points such as towns with an airport, towns with
a network of highways, and railroads entering and departing.
Normally, choose only towns indicated by splashes of yellow
on the chart. Do not choose towns represented by a small
circle—these may turn out to be only a half-dozen houses. (In
isolated areas, however, towns represented by a small circle
can be prominent checkpoints.) For this trip, four checkpoints
have been selected. Checkpoint 1 consists of a tower located
east of the course and can be further identified by the highway
and railroad track, which almost parallels the course at this
point. Checkpoint 2 is the obstruction just to the west of the
course and can be further identified by Will Rogers World Airport which is directly to the east. Checkpoint 3 is Wiley
Post Airport, which the aircraft should fly directly over.
Checkpoint 4 is a private, non-surfaced airport to the west of
the course and can be further identified by the railroad track
and highway to the east of the course.

 

15-19