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Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge
Airspace

Air Traffic Control and the National Airspace System

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Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

Preface

Acknowledgements

Table of Contents

Chapter 1, Introduction To Flying
Chapter 2, Aircraft Structure
Chapter 3, Principles of Flight
Chapter 4, Aerodynamics of Flight
Chapter 5, Flight Controls
Chapter 6, Aircraft Systems
Chapter 7, Flight Instruments
Chapter 8, Flight Manuals and Other Documents
Chapter 9, Weight and Balance
Chapter 10, Aircraft Performance
Chapter 11, Weather Theory
Chapter 12, Aviation Weather Services
Chapter 13, Airport Operation
Chapter 14, Airspace
Chapter 15, Navigation
Chapter 16, Aeromedical Factors
Chapter 17, Aeronautical Decision Making

Appendix

Glossary

Index

Requirements for airspace operations.
Figure 14-10. Requirements for airspace operations.

Unless otherwise authorized by ATC, all aircraft within Class
B airspace must be equipped with the applicable operating
transponder and automatic altitude reporting equipment
specified in 14 CFR section 91.215(a) and an operable
two-way radio capable of communications with ATC on
appropriate frequencies for that Class B airspace area.

Class C
For the purpose of this section, the primary airport is the
airport for which the Class C airspace area is designated. A
satellite airport is any other airport within the Class C airspace
area. No pilot may take off or land an aircraft at a satellite
airport within a Class C airspace area except in compliance
with FAA arrival and departure traffic patterns.

Two-way radio communications must be established and
maintained with the ATC facility providing air traffic services
prior to entering the airspace and thereafter maintained while
within the airspace.

A pilot departing from the primary airport or satellite airport
with an operating control tower must establish and maintain
two-way radio communications with the control tower,
and thereafter as instructed by ATC while operating in the
Class C airspace area. If departing from a satellite airport
without an operating control tower, the pilot must establish
and maintain two-way radio communications with the ATC
facility having jurisdiction over the Class C airspace area as
soon as practicable after departing.

Unless otherwise authorized by the ATC having jurisdiction
over the Class C airspace area, all aircraft within Class C
airspace must be equipped with the appropriate transponder
equipment meeting all applicable specifications found in 14
CFR section 91.215.

Class D
No pilot may take off or land an aircraft at a satellite airport
within a Class D airspace area except in compliance with
FAA arrival and departure traffic patterns. A pilot departing
from the primary airport or satellite airport with an operating
control tower must establish and maintain two-way radio
communications with the control tower, and thereafter as
instructed by ATC while operating in the Class D airspace
area. If departing from a satellite airport without an operating
control tower, the pilot must establish and maintain two way
radio communications with the ATC facility having
jurisdiction over the Class D airspace area as soon as
practicable after departing.

Two-way radio communications must be established and
maintained with the ATC facility providing air traffic services
prior to entering the airspace and thereafter maintained while
within the airspace.

If the aircraft radio fails in flight under IFR, the pilot
should continue the flight by the route assigned in the last
ATC clearance received; or, if being radar vectored, by the
direct route from the point of radio failure to the fix, route,
or airway specified in the vector clearance. In the absence
of an assigned route, the pilot should continue by the route
that ATC advised may be expected in a further clearance;
or, if a route had

 

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