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Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge
Airspace

Air Traffic Control and the National Airspace System

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Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

Preface

Acknowledgements

Table of Contents

Chapter 1, Introduction To Flying
Chapter 2, Aircraft Structure
Chapter 3, Principles of Flight
Chapter 4, Aerodynamics of Flight
Chapter 5, Flight Controls
Chapter 6, Aircraft Systems
Chapter 7, Flight Instruments
Chapter 8, Flight Manuals and Other Documents
Chapter 9, Weight and Balance
Chapter 10, Aircraft Performance
Chapter 11, Weather Theory
Chapter 12, Aviation Weather Services
Chapter 13, Airport Operation
Chapter 14, Airspace
Chapter 15, Navigation
Chapter 16, Aeromedical Factors
Chapter 17, Aeronautical Decision Making

Appendix

Glossary

Index

Pilots also comply with very strict FAA general operating
and flight rules as outlined in the CFR, including the FAA's
important "see and avoid" mandate. These regulations
provide the historical foundation of the FAA regulations
governing the aviation system and the individual classes of
airspace. Figure 14-10 lists the operational and equipment
requirements for these various classes of airspace. It will
be helpful to refer to this figure as the specific classes are
discussed in greater detail.

Class A
Pilots operating an aircraft in Class A airspace must conduct
that operation under IFR and only under an ATC clearance
received prior to entering the airspace. Unless otherwise
authorized by ATC, each aircraft operating in Class A
airspace must be equipped with a two-way radio capable of
communicating with ATC on a frequency assigned by ATC.
Unless otherwise authorized by ATC, all aircraft within Class
A airspace must be equipped with the appropriate transponder
equipment meeting all applicable specifications found in 14
CFR section 91.215.

Class B
All pilots operating an aircraft within a Class B airspace area
must receive an ATC clearance from the ATC facility having
jurisdiction for that area. The pilot in command (PIC) may
not take off or land an aircraft at an airport within a Class
B airspace unless he or she has met one of the following
requirements:
1. A private pilot certificate.
2. A recreational pilot certificate and all requirements
contained within 14 CFR section 61.101(d), or the
requirements for a student pilot seeking a recreational
pilot certificate in 14 CFR section 61.94.
3. A sport pilot certificate and all requirements contained
within 14 CFR section 61.325, or the requirements for
a student pilot seeking a recreational pilot certificate
in 14 CFR section 61.94, or the aircraft is operated
by a student pilot who has met the requirements of 14
CFR sections 61.94 and 61.95, as applicable.

Visual flight rule weather minimums.
Figure 14-9. Visual flight rule weather minimums.

 

14-8