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Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge
Aviation Weather Services

Aviation Weather Reports

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Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

Preface

Acknowledgements

Table of Contents

Chapter 1, Introduction To Flying
Chapter 2, Aircraft Structure
Chapter 3, Principles of Flight
Chapter 4, Aerodynamics of Flight
Chapter 5, Flight Controls
Chapter 6, Aircraft Systems
Chapter 7, Flight Instruments
Chapter 8, Flight Manuals and Other Documents
Chapter 9, Weight and Balance
Chapter 10, Aircraft Performance
Chapter 11, Weather Theory
Chapter 12, Aviation Weather Services
Chapter 13, Airport Operation
Chapter 14, Airspace
Chapter 15, Navigation
Chapter 16, Aeromedical Factors
Chapter 17, Aeronautical Decision Making

Appendix

Glossary

Index

PIREP encoding and decoding.
Figure 12-10. PIREP encoding and decoding.

Example:
UA/OV GGG 090025/TM 1450/FL 060/TP C182/SK
080 OVC/WX FV 04R/TA 05/WV 270030/TB LGT/RM
HVY RAIN
Explanation:
Type: .................................Routine pilot report
Location: .......................... 25 NM out on the 090┬░ radial,
Gregg County VOR
Time: ................................ 1450 Zulu
Altitude or Flight Level: 6,000 feet
Aircraft Type: ................... Cessna 182
Sky Cover: ........................ 8,000 overcast
Visibility/Weather: ........... 4 miles in rain
Temperature: .....................5 ┬░Celsius
Wind: ................................ 270┬░ at 30 knots
Turbulence: .......................Light
Icing: ................................ None reported
Remarks: .......................... Rain is heavy

Radar Weather Reports (RAREP)
Areas of precipitation and thunderstorms are observed by radar
on a routine basis. Radar weather reports (RAREPs) or storm
detections (SDs) are issued by radar stations at 35 minutes
past the hour, with special reports issued as needed.

RAREPs provide information on the type, intensity, and
location of the echo top of the precipitation. [Figure 12-11]
These reports may also include direction and speed of
the area of precipitation, as well as the height and base of
the precipitation in hundreds of feet MSL. RAREPs are
especially valuable for preflight planning to help avoid
areas of severe weather. However, radar only detects objects
in the atmosphere that are large enough to be considered
precipitation. Cloud bases and tops, ceilings, and visibility
are not detected by radar.

Radar weather report codes.
Figure 12-11. Radar weather report codes.

 

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