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Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge
Aircraft Performance
Transport Category Airplane Performance

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Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

Preface

Acknowledgements

Table of Contents

Chapter 1, Introduction To Flying
Chapter 2, Aircraft Structure
Chapter 3, Principles of Flight
Chapter 4, Aerodynamics of Flight
Chapter 5, Flight Controls
Chapter 6, Aircraft Systems
Chapter 7, Flight Instruments
Chapter 8, Flight Manuals and Other Documents
Chapter 9, Weight and Balance
Chapter 10, Aircraft Performance
Chapter 11, Weather Theory
Chapter 12, Aviation Weather Services
Chapter 13, Airport Operation
Chapter 14, Airspace
Chapter 15, Navigation
Chapter 16, Aeromedical Factors
Chapter 17, Aeronautical Decision Making

Appendix

Glossary

Index

Landing distance graph.
Figure 10-32. Landing distance graph.

Stall Speed Performance Charts
Stall speed performance charts are designed to give an
understanding of the speed at which the aircraft will stall
in a given configuration. This type of chart will typically
take into account the angle of bank, the position of the gear
and flaps, and the throttle position. Use Figure 10-33 and
the accompanying conditions to find the speed at which the
airplane will stall.

Sample Problem 13
Power........................................................................ OFF
Flaps....................................................................... Down
Gear........................................................................ Down
Angle of Bank............................................................. 45°
First, locate the correct flap and gear configuration. The
bottom half of the chart should be used since the gear and
flaps are down. Next, choose the row corresponding to a
power-off situation. Now, find the correct angle of bank
column, which is 45°. The stall speed is 78 mph, and the
stall speed in knots would be 68 knots.

Performance charts provide valuable information to the
pilot. Take advantage of these charts. A pilot can predict the
performance of the aircraft under most flying conditions, and
this enables a better plan for every flight. The Code of Federal
Regulations (CFR) requires that a pilot be familiar with all
information available prior to any flight. Pilots should use
the information to their advantage as it can only contribute
to safety in flight.

Transport Category Airplane Performance

Transport category aircraft are certi.cated under Title 14
of the CFR (14 CFR) parts 25 and 29. The airworthiness
certification standards of part 25 and 29 require proven
levels of performance and guarantee safety margins for these
aircraft, regardless of the specific operating regulations under
which they are employed.

Stall speed table.
Figure 10-33. Stall speed table.

 

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