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Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge
Aircraft Performance
Performance Charts

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Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

Preface

Acknowledgements

Table of Contents

Chapter 1, Introduction To Flying
Chapter 2, Aircraft Structure
Chapter 3, Principles of Flight
Chapter 4, Aerodynamics of Flight
Chapter 5, Flight Controls
Chapter 6, Aircraft Systems
Chapter 7, Flight Instruments
Chapter 8, Flight Manuals and Other Documents
Chapter 9, Weight and Balance
Chapter 10, Aircraft Performance
Chapter 11, Weather Theory
Chapter 12, Aviation Weather Services
Chapter 13, Airport Operation
Chapter 14, Airspace
Chapter 15, Navigation
Chapter 16, Aeromedical Factors
Chapter 17, Aeronautical Decision Making

Appendix

Glossary

Index

Interpolating charts.
To find the takeoff distance for a pressure altitude of 2,500 feet
at 20 °C, average the ground roll for 2,000 feet and 3,000 feet.
1,115 + 1,230 / 2 = 1,173 feet
Figure 10-20. Interpolating charts.

Density Altitude Charts
Use a density altitude chart to figure the density altitude at the
departing airport. Using Figure 10-21, determine the density
altitude based on the given information.
Sample Problem 1
Airport Elevation...............................................5,883 feet
OAT........................................................................... 70 °F
Altimeter........................................................... 30.10" Hg

First, compute the pressure altitude conversion. Find 30.10
under the altimeter heading. Read across to the second
column. It reads "–165." Therefore, it is necessary to subtract
165 from the airport elevation giving a pressure altitude of
5,718 feet. Next, locate the outside air temperature on the
scale along the bottom of the graph. From 70°, draw a line up
to the 5,718 feet pressure altitude line, which is about two thirds
of the way up between the 5,000 and 6,000 foot lines.

Draw a line straight across to the far left side of the graph
and read the approximate density altitude. The approximate
density altitude in thousands of feet is 7,700 feet.

Takeoff Charts
Takeoff charts are typically provided in several forms and allow
a pilot to compute the takeoff distance of the aircraft with no
flaps or with a specific flap configuration. A pilot can also
compute distances for a no flap takeoff over a 50 foot obstacle
scenario, as well as with flaps over a 50 foot obstacle. The
takeoff distance chart provides for various aircraft weights,
altitudes, temperatures, winds, and obstacle heights.

Sample Problem 2
Pressure Altitude...............................................2,000 feet
OAT..........................................................................22 °C
Takeoff Weight.............................................2,600 pounds
Headwind...............................................................6 knots
Obstacle Height.......................................50 foot obstacle
Refer to Figure 10-22. This chart is an example of a combined
takeoff distance graph. It takes into consideration pressure
altitude, temperature, weight, wind, and obstacles all on one
chart. First, find the correct temperature on the bottom left-

Density altitude chart.
Figure 10-21. Density altitude chart.

 

10-19