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Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge
Introduction To Flying
History of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)

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Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

Preface

Acknowledgements

Table of Contents

Chapter 1, Introduction To Flying
Chapter 2, Aircraft Structure
Chapter 3, Principles of Flight
Chapter 4, Aerodynamics of Flight
Chapter 5, Flight Controls
Chapter 6, Aircraft Systems
Chapter 7, Flight Instruments
Chapter 8, Flight Manuals and Other Documents
Chapter 9, Weight and Balance
Chapter 10, Aircraft Performance
Chapter 11, Weather Theory
Chapter 12, Aviation Weather Services
Chapter 13, Airport Operation
Chapter 14, Airspace
Chapter 15, Navigation
Chapter 16, Aeromedical Factors
Chapter 17, Aeronautical Decision Making

Appendix

Glossary

Index

A standard airway beacon tower.
Figure 1-7. A standard airway beacon tower.

The first pilot license was issued to William P. MacCracken, Jr.
Figure 1-8. The first pilot license was issued to William P.
MacCracken, Jr.

the Aeronautics Branch was renamed the Bureau of Air
Commerce. [Figure 1-9] Within this time frame, the Bureau
of Air Commerce brought together a group of airlines and
encouraged them to form the first three Air Traffic Control
(ATC) facilities along the established air routes. Then in 1936,
the Bureau of Air Commerce took over the responsibilities
of operating the centers and continued to advance the ATC
facilities. ATC has come a long way from the early controllers
using maps, chalkboards, and performing mental math
calculations in order to separate aircraft along flight routes.

The third head of the Aeronautics Branch Eugene L. Vidal
Figure 1-9. The third head of the Aeronautics Branch, Eugene
L. Vidal, is flanked by President Franklin D. Roosevelt (left) and
Secretary of Agriculture Henry A. Wallace (right). The photograph
was taken in 1933. During Vidal's tenure, the Aeronautics Branch
was renamed the Bureau of Air Commerce on July 1, 1934. The
new name more accurately reflected the status of the organization
within the Department of Commerce.

The Civil Aeronautics Act of 1938
In 1938, the Civil Aeronautics Act transferred the civil
aviation responsibilities to a newly created, independent
body, named the Civil Aeronautics Authority (CAA). This
Act empowered the CAA to regulate airfares and establish
new routes for the airlines to service.

President Franklin Roosevelt split the CAA into two
agencies, the Civil Aeronautics Administration (CAA) and
the Civil Aeronautics Board (CAB). Both agencies were
still part of the Department of Commerce but the CAB
functioned independently of the Secretary of Commerce.
The role of the CAA was to facilitate ATC, certification of
airmen and aircraft, rule enforcement, and the development
of new airways. The CAB was charged with rule making
to enhance safety, accident investigation, and the economic
regulation of the airlines. Then in 1946, Congress gave the

 

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