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Instrument Flying Handbook
Airplane Basic Flight Maneuvers Using an Electronic Flight Display
Straight Climbs and Descents

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Instrument Flying
Handbook

Preface

Table of Contents

Chapter 1. Human Factors
Chapter 2. Aerodynamic Factors
Chapter 3. Flight Instruments
Chapter 4. Section I
Airplane Attitude Instrument
Flying
Using Analog Instrumentation
Chapter 4. Section II
Airplane Attitude Instrument
Flying
Using an Electronic Flight
Display

Chapter 5. Section I
Airplane Basic
Flight Maneuvers
Using Analog Instrumentation
Chapter 5. Section II
Airplane Basic
Flight Maneuvers
Using an Electronic Flight
Display

Chapter 6. Helicopter
Attitude Instrument Flying

Chapter 7. Navigation Systems
Chapter 8. The National
Airspace System

Chapter 9. The Air Traffic
Control System

Chapter 10. IFR Flight
Chapter 11. Emergency
Operations

Straight Climbs and Descents

Each aircraft will have a specific pitch attitude and airspeed
that corresponds to the most efficient climb rate for a specified
weight. The POH/AFM contains the speeds that will produce
the desired climb. These numbers are based on maximum
gross weight. Pilots must he familiar with how the speeds will
vary with weight so they can compensate during flight.

Entry

Constant Airspeed Climb From Cruise Airspeed
To enter a constant airspeed climb from cruise airspeed,
slowly and smoothly apply aft elevator pressure in order
to raise the yellow chevron (aircraft symbol) until the tip
points to the desired degree of pitch. [Figure 5-63] Hold
the aft control pressure and smoothly increase the power
to the climb power setting. This increase in power may be
initiated either prior to initiating the pitch change or after

having established the desired pitch setting. Consult the
POH/AFM for specific climb power settings if anything other
than a full power climb is desired. Pitch attitudes will vary
depending on the type of aircraft being flown. As airspeed
decreases, control forces will need to be increased in order
to compensate for the additional elevator deflection required
to maintain attitude. Utilize trim to eliminate any control
pressures. By effectively using trim, the pilot will be better
able to maintain the desired pitch without constant attention.
The pilot is thus able to devote more time to maintaining an
effective scan of all instrumentation.

The VSI should be utilized to monitor the performance of the
aircraft. With a smooth pitch transition, the VSI tape should
begin to show an immediate trend upward and stabilize on a
rate of climb equivalent to the pitch and power setting being
utilized. Depending on current weight and atmospheric
conditions, this rate will be different. This will require the
pilot to be knowledgeable of how weight and atmospheric
conditions affect aircraft performance.

Constant Airspeed Climb From Cruise Airspeed.
Figure 5-63. Constant Airspeed Climb From Cruise Airspeed.
 
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