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Instrument Flying Handbook
Emergency Operations
Situational Awareness

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Instrument Flying
Handbook

Preface

Table of Contents

Chapter 1. Human Factors
Chapter 2. Aerodynamic Factors
Chapter 3. Flight Instruments
Chapter 4. Section I
Airplane Attitude Instrument
Flying
Using Analog Instrumentation
Chapter 4. Section II
Airplane Attitude Instrument
Flying
Using an Electronic Flight
Display

Chapter 5. Section I
Airplane Basic
Flight Maneuvers
Using Analog Instrumentation
Chapter 5. Section II
Airplane Basic
Flight Maneuvers
Using an Electronic Flight
Display

Chapter 6. Helicopter
Attitude Instrument Flying

Chapter 7. Navigation Systems
Chapter 8. The National
Airspace System

Chapter 9. The Air Traffic
Control System

Chapter 10. IFR Flight
Chapter 11. Emergency
Operations

The MFD is another means of viewing the nearest airports.
Figure 11-13. The MFD is another means of viewing the nearest airports.

2. RNWY. Moves the cursor into the runways section
and allows the user to scroll through the available
runways at a specific airport that is selected in
conjunction with the APT soft key. A green arrow
indicates additional runways to view.

3. FREQ. Moves the cursor into the Frequencies section
and allows the pilot to highlight and auto-tune the
frequency into the selected standby box.

4. APR. Moves the cursor into the Approach section and
allows the pilot to review approaches and load them
into the flight plan. When the APR soft key is selected,
an additional soft key appears. The LD APR (Load
Approach) soft key must be pressed once the desired
instrument approach procedure has been highlighted.
Once the soft key is pressed, the screen changes to the
PROC Page Group. From this page the pilot is able to
choose the desired approach, the transition, and choose
the option to activate the approach or just load it into
the flight plan.

Situational Awareness

Situational awareness (SA) is not simply a mental picture of
aircraft location; rather, it is an overall assessment of each
element of the environment and how it affects a flight. On one
end of the SA spectrum is a pilot who is knowledgeable of
every aspect of the flight; consequently, this pilot's decision-
making is proactive. With good SA, the pilot is able to make
decisions well ahead of time and evaluate several different
options. On the other end of the SA spectrum is a pilot who
is missing important pieces of the puzzle: "I knew exactly
where I was when I ran out of fuel," Consequently, this
pilot's decision-making is reactive. With poor SA, a pilot
lacks a vision of future events and is forced to make decisions
quickly, often with limited options.

Page Groups.
Figure 11-14. Page Groups. As the FMS outer knob is rotated, the
current page group is indicated by highlighting the specific group
indicator. Notice that the MAP page group is highlighted.

 
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