| Home | Privacy | Contact |

Airplane Flying Handbook
Glossary

| First | Previous | Next | Last |

Airplane Flying Handbook

Preface

Table of Contents

Chapter 1,Introduction to Flight Training
Chapter 2,Ground Operations
Chapter 3,Basic Flight Maneuvers
Chapter 4, Slow Flight, Stalls, and Spins
Chapter 5, Takeoff and Departure Climbs
Chapter 6, Ground Reference Maneuvers
Chapter 7, Airport Traffic Patterns
Chapter 8, Approaches and Landings
Chapter 9, Performance Maneuvers
Chapter 10, Night Operations
Chapter 11,Transition to Complex Airplanes
Chapter 12, Transition to Multiengine Airplanes
Chapter 13,Transition to Tailwheel Airplanes
Chapter 14, Transition to Turbo-propeller Powered Airplanes
Chapter 15,Transition to Jet Powered Airplanes
Chapter 16,Emergency Procedures

Glossary

Index

Glossary

AIRWORTHINESS—A condition
in which the aircraft conforms to its
type certificated design including
supplemental type certificates, and
field approved alterations. The
aircraft must also be in a condition for
safe flight as determined by annual,
100 hour, preflight and any other
required inspections.

AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATE—
A certificate issued by the FAA to all
aircraft that have been proven to meet
the minimum standards set down by
the Code of Federal Regulations.

AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVE—A regulatory notice
sent out by the FAA to the registered
owner of an aircraft informing the
owner of a condition that prevents the
aircraft from continuing to meet
its conditions for airworthiness.
Airworthiness Directives (AD notes)
must be complied with within the
required time limit, and the fact of
compliance, the date of compliance,
and the method of compliance must be
recorded in the aircraft's maintenance
records.

ALPHA MODE OF OPERATION—The operation of a
turboprop engine that includes all of
the flight operations, from takeoff to
landing. Alpha operation is typically
between 95 percent to 100 percent of
the engine operating speed.

ALTERNATE AIR—A device
which opens, either automatically
or manually, to allow induction airflow
to continue should the primary
induction air opening become
blocked.

ALTERNATE STATIC SOURCE—
A manual port that when opened
allows the pitot static instruments to
sense static pressure from an alternate
location should the primary static port
become blocked.

ALTERNATOR/GENERATOR—A
device that uses engine power to generate
electrical power.

ALTIMETER—A flight instrument
that indicates altitude by sensing
pressure changes.

ALTITUDE (AGL)—The actual
height above ground level (AGL) at
which the aircraft is flying.

ALTITUDE (MSL)—The actual
height above mean sea level (MSL) at
which the aircraft is flying.

ALTITUDE CHAMBER—A device
that simulates high altitude conditions
by reducing the interior pressure. The
occupants will suffer from the same
physiological conditions as flight at
high altitude in an unpressurized
aircraft.

ALTITUDE ENGINE—
A reciprocating aircraft engine having
a rated takeoff power that is
producible from sea level to an
established higher altitude.

ANGLE OF ATTACK—The acute
angle between the chord line of the
airfoil and the direction of the relative
wind.

ANGLE OF INCIDENCE—
The angle formed by the chord line of
the wing and a line parallel to the
longitudinal axis of the airplane.

ANNUAL INSPECTION—
A complete inspection of an aircraft
and engine, required by the Code
of Federal Regulations, to be
accomplished every 12 calendar
months on all certificated aircraft.
Only an A&P technician holding an
Inspection Authorization can conduct
an annual inspection.

ANTI-ICING—The prevention of
the formation of ice on a surface. Ice
may be prevented by using heat or by
covering the surface with a chemical
that prevents water from reaching the
surface. Anti-icing should not be confused
with deicing, which is the
removal of ice after it has formed on
the surface.

ATTITUDE INDICATOR—
An instrument which uses an artificial
horizon and miniature airplane to
depict the position of the airplane in
relation to the true horizon. The
attitude indicator senses roll as well as
pitch, which is the up and down
movement of the airplane's nose.

ATTITUDE— The position of an
aircraft as determined by the
relationship of its axes and a reference,
usually the earth's horizon.

AUTOKINESIS—This is caused by
staring at a single point of light
against a dark background for more
than a few seconds. After a few
moments, the light appears to move
on its own.

AUTOPILOT—An automatic flight
control system which keeps an aircraft
in level flight or on a set course.
Automatic pilots can be directed by
the pilot, or they may be coupled to a
radio navigation signal.

AXES OF AN AIRCRAFT—Three
imaginary lines that pass through an
aircraft's center of gravity. The axes
can be considered as imaginary axles
around which the aircraft turns. The
three axes pass through the center of
gravity at 90° angles to each other.
The axis from nose to tail is the
longitudinal axis, the axis that passes
from wingtip to wingtip is the lateral
axis, and the axis that passes vertically
through the center of gravity is the
vertical axis.

AXIAL FLOW COMPRESSOR—
A type of compressor used in a turbine
engine in which the airflow through
the compressor is essentially linear.
An axial-flow compressor is made up
of several stages of alternate rotors
and stators. The compressor ratio is
determined by the decrease in area of
the succeeding stages.

BACK SIDE OF THE POWER
CURVE— Flight regime in which
flight at a higher airspeed requires a
lower power setting and a lower
airspeed requires a higher power
setting in order to maintain altitude.

BALKED LANDING—
A go-around.

BALLAST—Removable or permanently
installed weight in an aircraft
used to bring the center of gravity into
the allowable range.

 

G-2