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Airplane Flying Handbook
Turbo-propeller Powered Airplanes
TURBOPROP AIRPLANE ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS

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Airplane Flying Handbook

Preface

Table of Contents

Chapter 1,Introduction to Flight Training
Chapter 2,Ground Operations
Chapter 3,Basic Flight Maneuvers
Chapter 4, Slow Flight, Stalls, and Spins
Chapter 5, Takeoff and Departure Climbs
Chapter 6, Ground Reference Maneuvers
Chapter 7, Airport Traffic Patterns
Chapter 8, Approaches and Landings
Chapter 9, Performance Maneuvers
Chapter 10, Night Operations
Chapter 11,Transition to Complex Airplanes
Chapter 12, Transition to Multiengine Airplanes
Chapter 13,Transition to Tailwheel Airplanes
Chapter 14, Transition to Turbo-propeller Powered Airplanes
Chapter 15,Transition to Jet Powered Airplanes
Chapter 16,Emergency Procedures

Glossary

Index

Multiengine turboprop airplanes normally have
several power sources—a battery and at least one
generator per engine. The electrical systems are
usually designed so that any bus can be energized by
any of the power sources. For example, a typical
system might have a right and left generator buses
powered normally by the right and left engine-driven
generators. These buses will be connected by a
normally open switch, which isolates them from each
other. If one generator fails, power will be lost to its
bus, but power can be restored to that bus by closing a
bus tie switch. Closing this switch connects the buses
and allows the operating generator to power both.

Power distribution buses are protected from short
circuits and other malfunctions by a type of fuse called
a current limiter. In the case of excessive current
supplied by any power source, the current limiter will
open the circuit and thereby isolate that power source
and allow the affected bus to become separated from
the system. The other buses will continue to operate
normally. Individual electrical components are
connected to the buses through circuit breakers. A
circuit breaker is a device which opens an electrical
circuit when an excess amount of current flows.

Simplified schematic of turboprop airplane electrical system.
Figure 14-10. Simplified schematic of turboprop airplane electrical system.

 

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